6 - 15 july 2018

Glitch - the art of fault in 3D printing

Date

6 - 15 July, 10:00 - 20:00

place:

PSTP Gdynia, building IV

What is a GLITCH? Can you design a fault? Can a fault be an art?

Cambridge Dictionary defines Glitch as a small problem or fault that prevents something from being successful or working as well as it should. We usually use the word to describe many different flaws that happen without our intent in digital works. They tend to annoy us, but sometimes look so amazing that they inspire us in our work.

3D printing technology gives us endless possibilities. We can print in a constantly growing array of materials: metals, plastics, ceramics to name a few. You could think that it’s a fully automated process free of flaws, but 3D printing isn’t ideal, nothing is. Errors in 3D printing happen sometimes too often, good thing it’s a repeatable process, and you can learn on mistakes. Sadly not every fault is art so mostly they mean bad prints. Sometimes though designers themselves push the limits of their printers and imprint the flaws in their 3D design. The pieces than printed are unique forms made by a union of man and machine.

The GLITCH exhibition presents objects made with different materials but all 3D printed. Some were produced on normal desktop 3D printers some were made using 3D printers made by designers themselves. All are different & all are unique.

Speaker:

  • UAU project is a multidisciplinary design studio based in Warsaw, Poland. Founded in 2011 by Justyna Fałdzińska & Miłosz Dąbrowski, graduates from Industrial Design Faculty on Warsaw Academy of Fine Arts. Currently our main interest is exploring and experimenting with consumer oriented 3D printing for use in home production. We want to show that 3D printing is the best way to make good design accessible. We develop our products with passion and commitment, with only the best quality materials. Our environment is of utmost importance to us, so most of the materials we use are either biodegradable or highly recyclable.

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